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Become a member and receive career-enhancing benefits

Our top priority is providing value to members. Your Member Services team is here to ensure you maximize your ACS member benefits, participate in College activities, and engage with your ACS colleagues. It's all here.

Become a Member
Become a member and receive career-enhancing benefits

Our top priority is providing value to members. Your Member Services team is here to ensure you maximize your ACS member benefits, participate in College activities, and engage with your ACS colleagues. It's all here.

Membership Benefits
ACS
Education Programs

Guide to Surgical Residency for Medical Students

Planning for after medical school

The ACS has developed a tool for medical students choosing a surgical residency. FAQs, resources, and suggested readings can be found in this guide.

So You Want to Be a Surgeon?

If surgery is your career path, we can help you every step of the way. This online guide for medical students has just what you need to know about residency and surgery—and when you need to know it. At ACS, we’ve been promoting excellence among surgeons for many years now. And we’d welcome the opportunity to do the same for you.

Because as a medical student, you are beginning your time as a prospective surgeon, there is a good deal of information that you will need along the way. The section on frequently asked questions gives a brief overview of the surgical specialties, postgraduate training requirements, and other general areas of inquiry.

As you move through this site, you will find links to other sites, and information about choosing an advisorthe importance of elective courses, the creation of surgical interest groups, a time line for third and fourth year medical students, and some suggested readings.

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The Value of Electives

During your fourth year of med school you’ll have the opportunity to take some electives. Most program directors agree that the fourth year should be spent learning things you won't cover in residency.