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Become a member and receive career-enhancing benefits

Our top priority is providing value to members. Your Member Services team is here to ensure you maximize your ACS member benefits, participate in College activities, and engage with your ACS colleagues. It's all here.

Become a Member
Become a member and receive career-enhancing benefits

Our top priority is providing value to members. Your Member Services team is here to ensure you maximize your ACS member benefits, participate in College activities, and engage with your ACS colleagues. It's all here.

Membership Benefits
ACS
Surgeon Well-Being

2024 ACS Member Well-Being Survey

The American College of Surgeons (ACS) has long supported the well-being of surgeons and understanding what drives burnout, depression, suicidal ideation, and moral distress. These issues—among other forms of workplace suffering—profoundly affect surgeons and their patients.

An ACS survey of 8,000 surgeons conducted in 2008 revealed that 40% of ACS member respondents fit the traditional criteria for burnout.1 In 2010, a second survey was conducted, which confirmed these results2 and helped us understand key drivers of burnout and surgeon coping strategies. The overall conclusion was that surgeons must be treated as whole people and not just as people doing a job. These data began the conversation that surgeon well-being, burnout, and depression are not signs of personal failure but are the result of workplace systems and culture.2

Survey Goals

The ACS is committed to advocating for surgeons by gathering data to ensure that we understand workplace processes, compensated and non-compensated responsibilities, values congruence, teamwork, and more areas related to well-being in order to affect change. The purpose of the survey is to pursue these important long-term goals:

  • Increase understanding of the surgeon workforce.
  • Identify workplace processes that enhance or inhibit surgeon well-being.  
  • Understand surgeon clinical and non-clinical workload and compensation.  
  • Use this data to drive evidence-based advocacy for surgeon workplace well-being.  

ACS Surgeon Well-Being Program

The ACS is committed to creating and supporting a robust effort to develop and sustain whole, flourishing surgeons and communities. The ACS Surgeon Well-Being Program launched in early 2020 with the vision of improving well-being, resilience, and work-life integration for surgeons at every career stage. The program’s efforts are centered around the ACS pillars of education, resources/tools, and advocacy with key short- and long-term strategic priorities to foster and advocate for surgeon well-being at individual and systemic levels. Since its inception, this group has created educational programs through yearly awareness campaigns, webinars and videos with well-being content, ACS publications focused on well-being, and educational sessions at ACS Clinical Congress and the Leadership and Advocacy Summit. They have also developed an online resource repository with tools to address well-being at the facs.org website.

Survey Issues 

If you are having issues accessing the survey, please enter your name and email address to receive a copy of the survey.

References

  1. Shanafelt TD, Balch CM, Bechamps GJ, et al. Burnout and career satisfaction among American surgeons. Ann Surg. 2009;250(3):463-471. https://doi:10.1097/SLA.0b013e3181ac4dfd 
  2. Shanafelt TD, Oreskovich MR, Dyrbye LN, et al. Avoiding burnout: the personal health habits and wellness practices of US surgeons. Ann Surg. 2012;255(4):625-633. https://doi:10.1097/SLA.0b013e31824b2fa0