American College Of Surgeons - Inspiring Quality: Highest Standards, Better Outcomes

Cancer

The American College of Surgeons (ACS) supports legislation which seeks to improve the survival and quality of life for cancer patients and survivors. The ACS Cancer Programs and Commission on Cancer (CoC) strongly encourage members of Congress to maintain a bipartisan commitment to cancer legislation with the overall goal of improving cancer care.

Federal Legislative Priorities

FY 2021 Appropriations Request

The ACS Cancer Programs have been strong advocates in the fight against cancer and securing additional cancer research and prevention funding. Past congressional support for federally funded cancer research has been the foundation for progress made in the battle against this disease. The ACS and the CoC strongly support the goal of maintaining and enhancing funding of these programs in order to build upon the momentum gained throughout the last few years. As a member of One Voice Against Cancer (OVAC), a broad coalition of cancer-related organizations working to make funding for cancer research and prevention programs a top priority, the ACS and CoC support following funding recommendations:

  • Increase funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) by at least $3 billion—for a total of $44.7 billion.
  • Provide at least $6.9 billion for the National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  • Provide at least $555 million for cancer control and prevention programs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), including $70 million for the National Cancer Registry program.

Palliative Care Education and Hospice Training Act

The ACS Commission on Cancer strongly believes palliative care plays an important role in improving the quality of life for cancer patients and their families. The Palliative Care Education and Hospice Training Act (PCHETA) (H.R. 647/S.2080), which was unanimously approved by the U.S. House of Representatives on October 28, 2019, focuses on training the current and emerging health care professional workforce in palliative care. ACS urges the U.S. Senate to take up and pass S. 647.

ACS Commission on Cancer Letter of Support for PCHETA

Take Action: Contact Your Senators in Support of PCHETA

Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act

According to the National Cancer Institute, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related death in the United States when men and women are combined. This statistic is especially troubling since colorectal cancer is largely preventable due to effective screening methods. The Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act (H.R. 1570/S. 668) would correct an oversight in current law that requires Medicare beneficiaries to pay a coinsurance when a colorectal cancer screening colonoscopy also involves a polyp removal during the screening encounter. H.R. 1570 passed in the U.S. House of Representatives on December 12, 2019; as such, advocacy will shift to the Senate, where ACS urges swift passage of the legislation.

Read ACS Letter of Support for the Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act

Take Action: Contact Congress in Support of the Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act

Legislative Successes

Breast Cancer Research Stamp Reauthorization Act

A longtime priority of the ACS and CoC, the Breast Cancer Research Stamp Reauthorization Act of 2019 was enacted in December 2019, reauthorizing the Breast Cancer Research Stamp for 8 years. Since its release in 1998, more than one billion of these stamps have been sold in the United States, raising more than $87.8 million for cutting edge breast cancer research.

Read ACS Support Letters for the Breast Cancer Research Stamp Reauthorization Act

Childhood Cancer STAR Act – Public Law 115-180

The Childhood Cancer STAR Act, (H.R. 820/S. 292) is an important step in advancing pediatric cancer research and child-focused cancer treatments, while also improving childhood cancer surveillance and providing resources for survivors of childhood cancer.