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Become a member and receive career-enhancing benefits

Our top priority is providing value to members. Your Member Services team is here to ensure you maximize your ACS member benefits, participate in College activities, and engage with your ACS colleagues. It's all here.

Become a Member
Become a member and receive career-enhancing benefits

Our top priority is providing value to members. Your Member Services team is here to ensure you maximize your ACS member benefits, participate in College activities, and engage with your ACS colleagues. It's all here.

Membership Benefits
ACS
Bulletin Brief

Well-Being

Use These Strategies to Help You Manage Stress

Knowing how to identify and manage stress is critical to well-being, especially if you are experiencing chronic or prolonged acute stress. Consider using the four strategies identified below (adapted from a Mayo Clinic News Network article) and coupling them with a guided body scan to support your stress management.

Avoid: Plan ahead, rearrange your surroundings, and reap the benefits of a lighter load.  Actions include:

  • Learn to say no. Turn down requests that will overcommit you. Or, if it is something you really want to do, give up something you are already doing.
  • Ditch part of your list. Prioritize your daily goals, and cut off the least important when possible.

Alter: Take inventory during stressful times; then attempt to change your situation.

  • Communicate your feelings openly. Remember to use "I" statements; as in, "I feel frustrated by shorter deadlines and a heavier workload. Is there something we can do to balance things out?"
  • State limits in advance. Instead of stewing over a colleague's nonstop chatter, politely start the conversation with, "I have only 5 minutes to cover this."

Accept: Find ways to manage stressful realities.

  • Practice positive self-talk. One negative thought can lead to another, and soon you've created a mental avalanche. Be positive. Instead of thinking, "I am horrible with money, and I will never be able to control my finances," try "I made a mistake with my money, but I'm resilient. I'll get through it."
  • Learn from your mistakes. Recognize a "teachable moment.” You can't change the fact that procrastination hurts your performance, but you can make sure you set aside more time in the future.

Adapt: Change your standards or expectations to help you deal with stress.

  • Adjust your standards. Redefine success and stop striving for perfection. You may operate with less guilt and frustration.
  • Reframe the issue. Try looking at your situation from a new viewpoint. Instead of feeling frustrated that you’re home with a sick child, look at it as an opportunity to bond, relax, and finish a load of laundry.
  • Look at the big picture. Ask yourself, "Will this matter in a year? In 5 years?" The answer is often no and makes a stressful situation seem less overwhelming.